Great Horned Owl

This Great Horned Owl was first spotted by TRC Ambassador Suzanne Knighton in Victor, ID. Staff looked and looked but couldn't find him. The next morning, he was spotted again and rescued. The owl has serious head and eye trauma known as uveitis with hyphema, meaning there is blood throughout the front and the back of the owl's eye. We're treating the owl with special eye drops three times a day and seeing a lot of improvement.

Date Admitted: 10.21.16

Location Found: Victor, ID

Update: The owl is finding food and perches on his own, but has little to no vision straight ahead or to the right. Because he does not have full vision in either eye, he will not be able to survive on his own in the wild. we are evaluating his temperament to determine if he could live comfortably in captivity as an ambassador for his species in an education program.

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GHOW 10.21.16 has eye trauma known as uveitis with hyphema, meaning there is blood throughout the front and the back of the owl's eye. Photo courtesy of Sue Ernisse.

GHOW 10.21.16 has eye trauma known as uveitis with hyphema, meaning there is blood throughout the front and the back of the owl's eye. Photo courtesy of Sue Ernisse.

The owl's eyes are treated with medicated drops. Photo courtesy of Sue Ernisse.

The owl's eyes are treated with medicated drops. Photo courtesy of Sue Ernisse.

An eye exam for the Great Horned Owl. Photo courtesy of Sue Ernisse.

An eye exam for the Great Horned Owl. Photo courtesy of Sue Ernisse.

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