Resident Raptors

At TRC, we provide homes and purpose for 13 raptors that cannot be released into the wild due to illness, injury, or origin. Though they can no longer balance ecosystems, their work is no less important. Now they serve as ambassadors for their species, allowing visitors an arm's length encounter with wildlife! Let's meet TRC's feathered team:

Manzana

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Barn Owl (Tyto alba)

Owly

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Great Horned Owl (Bubo virginianus)

Hunter

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus)

Beatrix

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)

K2

Photo Credit: Shari Dodd 

Photo Credit: Shari Dodd 

Eurasian Eagle-owl (Bubo bubo)

Gus

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

Golden Eagle (Aquila chrysaetos)

Frost

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

American Kestrel (Falco sparverius)

Hardeman 

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)

Taiga

Photo Credit: Becca Bredehoft 

Photo Credit: Becca Bredehoft 

Great Gray Owl (Strix nebulosa)

Hemlock

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Photo Credit: David Akoubian

Barred Owl (Strix varia)

Trayne and Otus

Photo Credit: Becca Bredehoft

Photo Credit: Becca Bredehoft

Eastern Screech Owl (Megascops asio)

Bert

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

Photo Credit: Cecil Holmes

Northern Saw-whet Owl (Aegolius acadicus)

In memoriam

Learn about the Raptors that are no longer with us, but played an important role at TRC during their lifetime.




Banner photo: Resident Red-tailed Hawk Hardeman, Photo credit: Bob Bailey

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